Use of a Broken or Risky Cryptographic Algorithm

The use of a broken or risky cryptographic algorithm is an unnecessary risk that may result in the exposure of sensitive information.


Description

The use of a non-standard algorithm is dangerous because a determined attacker may be able to break the algorithm and compromise whatever data has been protected. Well-known techniques may exist to break the algorithm.

Background

Cryptographic algorithms are the methods by which data is scrambled. There are a small number of well-understood and heavily studied algorithms that should be used by most applications. It is quite difficult to produce a secure algorithm, and even high profile algorithms by accomplished cryptographic experts have been broken.

Since the state of cryptography advances so rapidly, it is common for an algorithm to be considered "unsafe" even if it was once thought to be strong. This can happen when new attacks against the algorithm are discovered, or if computing power increases so much that the cryptographic algorithm no longer provides the amount of protection that was originally thought.

Demonstrations

The following examples help to illustrate the nature of this weakness and describe methods or techniques which can be used to mitigate the risk.

Note that the examples here are by no means exhaustive and any given weakness may have many subtle varieties, each of which may require different detection methods or runtime controls.

Example One

These code examples use the Data Encryption Standard (DES).

EVP_des_ecb();
Cipher des=Cipher.getInstance("DES...");
des.initEncrypt(key2);
function encryptPassword($password){
  $iv_size = mcrypt_get_iv_size(MCRYPT_DES, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB);
  $iv = mcrypt_create_iv($iv_size, MCRYPT_RAND);
  $key = "This is a password encryption key";
  $encryptedPassword = mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_DES, $key, $password, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB, $iv);
  return $encryptedPassword;
}

Once considered a strong algorithm, DES now regarded as insufficient for many applications. It has been replaced by Advanced Encryption Standard (AES).

See Also

SEI CERT C Coding Standard - Guidelines 48. Miscellaneous (MSC)

Weaknesses in this category are related to the rules and recommendations in the Miscellaneous (MSC) section of the SEI CERT C Coding Standard.

SEI CERT Oracle Secure Coding Standard for Java - Guidelines 49. Miscellaneous (MSC)

Weaknesses in this category are related to the rules and recommendations in the Miscellaneous (MSC) section of the SEI CERT Oracle Secure Coding Standard for Java.

CISQ Quality Measures - Security

Weaknesses in this category are related to the CISQ Quality Measures for Security. Presence of these weaknesses could reduce the security of the software.

Comprehensive CWE Dictionary

This view (slice) covers all the elements in CWE.

Weaknesses for Simplified Mapping of Published Vulnerabilities

CWE entries in this view (graph) may be used to categorize potential weaknesses within sources that handle public, third-party vulnerability information, such as the N...

Weaknesses without Software Fault Patterns

CWE identifiers in this view are weaknesses that do not have associated Software Fault Patterns (SFPs), as covered by the CWE-888 view. As such, they represent gaps in...


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